Nov 8, 2017 in Opinion

Revolutionary Theorist

After Washington retirement in the year 1797, John Adams went for the post of president and ended up winning the election. Abigail Adams later joined him in Philadelphia in May the same year. She settled up as the first lady. Her husband kept on discussing and consulting Abigail Adams where necessary for advices. Abigail continued writing letters to her friends and even proceeded managing the family farm through communicating with her sister, Mary Crunch.

In the summer of the year 1797, Abigail Adams become ill on a trip home to Braintree. This led to another separation when her husband returned Philadelphia in October. Abigail finally recovered and returned to Philadelphia one year after, where she stayed and supported her husband in the rest of the term in office.

In 1800, after John Adams loosed her bid to reelection, Abigail Adams continued to keep herself busy by managing her home. The family remained beset with poor health. Both Crunch and her husband died after a long time illness. Abby Adams had been detected with cancer and this made him to go through an operation. John Adams afterwards injured his leg after an accident and this made him not to walk for many months. With all this problems in the family, Abigail Adams was always there to care and support them all.

In 1818, 28th October, Abigail Adams suffered a stroke, which made her to die quietly in a hospital where her family and friends surrounded her. Abigail son later become the United States presidents after six years. Abigail Adams had a distinct history of being 1st woman in United States history to be a wife of a president John Adams and the mother of another president John Quincy Adams

Abigail Adams believed that one of the most crucial paths in achieving equity was through educating women. This was a progressive opinion for the time. In herself, Abigail was not formally educated, this always humiliated her due to her inability to write and speak correct (French, Charles, 1999). Her uneducated status stimulated her aspiration for formal education for all women. In one of Abigail letters to her husband she said “if you complain of disregard of education in sons, what shall I say with regard to the ladies, who each day experience the desire of it?...I most earnestly wish some more liberal plan might be put down and executed for the advantage of rising generation” (Abigail 14 august 1776).Abigail believed that once women got educated they could rise and be “statesmen, philosophers and heroes” of the society (Abigail, Adams 14 august 1776). This look into on women’s education was really ahead of its time and indication for what was to come later in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Not only did Abigail Adams convey her liberal opinions to her John Adams, but also to other crucial people in the colonial society. In a letter she wrote to John Theater, Abigail’s brother in law who happened to be a statesman, in the letter Abigail Adams asked “why should your sex desire for such a gap in those in one day intend for associates and comparison…..cannot assist sometimes suspecting that this disregard arises in some measure from a stingy jealousy of opponents near the throne” (Abigail, Adams 15 feb.1778). Abigail Adams was condemning men of being afraid of equal opportunity for women because they feared women would become powerful. For her to articulate this in writing, show that she had radical and critical opinions and views which were extraordinary and surprising for a woman at such a time.

Abigail Adams did not only fight for equality in women but also fought for the rights of the blacks. She opposed slavery. In one of her letters she quoted” I doubt whether the founding fathers were passionate about liberation because they seem to deprive their fellows’ freedom the deserved” (Abigail Adams 31 march 1776).In additional Abigail believed that blacks also needed education. At one given time a black servant boy came Abigail Adams to ask for assistance in writing, she instantly signed up the boy in a local school where he could study. Abigail reacted to this matter by arguing that “the young boy was a free man as much as other white young men.And because his face is black he is not supposed to be denied education”. To fully support this Abigail Adams stood up for the blacks by stating that “all people are all equal including women and blacks, if given the same opportunities they were equally intelligent (Abigail, Adams 14 august 1776).

Abigail Adams has been described to be more of a revolutionary theorist than other leaders of American Revolution. The responsibility she played in building her husband political career, her opinions and views on women education and equality and her stand up for equal rights for the blacks’ people challenged the factual meaning of the word equality. She saw the pretense in the founding fathers pursuit for equality because at the time they were fighting for the freedom, they instituted to restrain the rights of women and black slaves.Abigail was very distinct from other women in the society during the colonial era as she fully challenged the male subjugated society. Martha Washington, the wife of the first president of United States of America was only known for her outstanding hostess skills, unlike Abigail, she did not at any time talk on the rights of women to her husband.

Abigail Adams was a real revolutionary and ahead of her time. Although she did not have an immense impact in 18th century in America, her fundamental ideas and opinions will continue to spread to the future generation and she is a representation of women’s rights and freedom. At the Harvard University a society called Abigail Adams was formed to create a medium where women would speak out their opinions. In addiction they have been establishment of Abigail Adams scholarships where women are given opportunities to receive higher education. The Massachusetts Women Political Group came up with Abigail Adams awards as an honor to women who get involved in promoting women’s rights. After several years of feminism and activists aggressive fighting for the equal rights of all people, Black’s people have started breaking the race and gender blockade. Strong and powerful women like Hillary Clinton,Condolezza rice and Michelle Obama have set a demonstration  how extreme blacks and woman have come from the time Abigail Adams wrote  aspiration letters  to her husband on 1776  requesting him to “remember the ladies”(Abigail, Adams March 31st 1776). The fight for equality among all people is still not over even after Abigail Adams wrote her aspiring letters, however considerable progress has been made.

JOHN ADAMS TO ABIGAIL ADAMS APRIL 14, 1776

"As to your extraordinary code of laws, I cannot but laugh.  "We have been told that our struggle has loosened the bonds of government everywhere; that children and apprentices were disobedient; that schools and colleges were grown turbulent; that Indians slighted their guardians, and Negroes grew insolent to their masters.

"But your letters was the first intimation that another tribe, more numerous and powerful than all the rest, were grown discontented."This is rather too coarse a compliment, but you are so saucy, I won't blot it out.

"Depend upon it, we know better than to repeal our masculine systems. Although they are in full force, you know they are little more than theory. We dare not exert our power in its full latitude. We are obliged to go fair and softly, and, in practice, you know we are the subjects."We have only the name of masters, and rather than give up this, which would completely subject us to the despotism of the petticoat, I hope General Washington and all our brave heroes would fight."

ABIGAIL ADAMS TO JOHN ADAMS ON MAY 7, 1776

"I cannot say that I think you are very generous to the ladies; for, whilst you are proclaiming peace and good-will to men, emancipating all nations, you insist upon retaining an absolute power over wives.

"But you must remember that arbitrary power is like most other things which are very hard, very liable to be broken; and, notwithstanding all your wise laws and maxims, we have it in our power, not only to free ourselves, but to subdue our masters, and without violence, throw both your natural and legal authority at our feet."

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