Nov 8, 2017 in Informative

“The Sacred Heart” Painting

The masochistic painting where there is a naked woman with no face and the way she holds the violin in her hand as if she’s about to throw it away since its old. The shape of the violin repeats the female form but in this painting it should be read as a phallic object.There is an erect pole with a piece of cloth flowing from the end of it attached to the tree can also be read as phallic” (Dali, 67). The tooth female genitalia, is the symbol of aggressive female sexuality and the incorporating mother represents the emergence of feelings and anxiety related to the universal topics of birth, death, sexuality and the appearance in Dali’s work reflects dramatic conflict solving mechanisms. Felipa, Dali’s mother was considered to be an extremely indulgent woman, who lived for her family. After giving birth to a daughter, supposedly she was already longing for a girl before the birth of the second Salvador: she treated the young Salvador as a girl, and dressed him in girlish clothes; later Dali painted himself as a young boy wearing such clothes. These childhood experiences were also the sources of Dali’s identity problems.

“The sacred heart” painting “sometimes/spit with pleasure on the portrait of my mother” signifies a lot about the hidden feelings he must have had towards his mother. His sexual anxiety developed in puberty, his major fears were related to masturbation: at the time it was considered to cause impotence, homosexuality or insanity. As for Dali masturbation was almost the exclusive source of pleasures in his life. Besides this Sexual defeatism was also typical of the young Dali: he found his penis small and limp compared to that of others, which is symbolized in his paintings by the crutches supporting objects and body parts that not able to stand on there own. Federal Garcia claims to have been shocked when he came home from America to find that Dali had found the woman of his life, it’s said that Lorca was convinced that the painter could only have an erection with a finger in his anus. Through his paintings Dali is also believed to prefer male bodies to the female ones.When he met Gala in1929 and married her it is said that the couple had a rather perverted married life: they liked to watch the other having sex with a third person. The love between the two put an end to the almost incestuous relationship between Dali and his younger sister. In the book “The tragic myth of Millet’s Angelus” Dali wrote about the fear of sexual intercourses and he went on to add about his syphilis phobia (Dalí, 77). His impotence is said to have occurred not because of his possible physical inabilities but also for he feared the annihilating power of the sexual relationship and his obsession that its consequences caused instantaneous death. Moreover the speculates that his fear of sex emerges from “a decisive traumatic incident of exceptional savagery that happened in my earliest childhood and was directly related to the Oedipus complex” (Dali, 82) ‘false recollection’ of my mother sucking and devouring my penis. It was his painful childhood that never allowed him to separate sex from shame and guilt. Dali spent an hour with Freud, quietly sketching him, in return Freud paid Dali a compliment of looking carefully at the portrait and thanking Zweig for introducing him to this “young Spaniard with his ingenuous fanatical eye” Freud to Dali became important in his role in most of his paintings. Freud used the psychoanalytical device of free association to trace the symbolic meaning of dream imagery to its source in the unconscious; Dali applied the same method to his pictorial imagery. Based on the psychoanalytic studies of paranoiac dementia, the artist consciously charged his paintings with psychological meaning which he called his “paranoiac- critical method,” which was Freud’s idea. Dali showed precocious gifts in the local catholic schools in Figueras, Spain where he was born. He is still and will remain a great painter even after his death and in his work he will be remembered.

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