Nov 8, 2017 in Book Report

What is Science

“Science is simply common sense at its best, that is, rigidly accurate in observation, and merciless to fallacy in logic.” This is what Thomas Huxley wrote in his book The Crayfish: An Introduction to the Study of Zoology (1879).

Thomas Huxley said this quote more than a hundred years ago; nevertheless, it still fits the present state of affairs as well as the present position of science. This definition is rather felicitous because criteria mentioned in the quote are factually criteria of the scientific methods and are basis for the whole science in general. With the help of rational thinking, not only a scientist as a representative of science, but actually every person can try to grasp the Universe. It is common knowledge that rational thinking is a right way of thinking and the objects of outer medium, which come into observation, come through the strict logical analysis; in addition, all scientific methods have the same basis. The process of creating theories should admit no mistakes; errors in science create a great delusion; the farther scientists proceed without correcting mistakes, the greater that delusion becomes. Thus, according to the definition under research, true science does not accept errors. That is why strict and stable logic in thinking, careful and close observation, clear and accurate experiments, rational and right conclusions are practically the main principles of every branch of science.

 Thomas Huxley used the right words to transfer the meaning and sense of ‘science’ for the humanity. His statement quiet correctly defines what science is in all aspects of human life with nothing to add or change.

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