Nov 8, 2017 in Analysis

Two Promising Places to Live, 1,200 Light-Years from Earth

The earth is the only known planet to scientists that supports life. Throughout the years scientists have been doing research to find out if there exists other planets like our earth that that may appear to support life.

According to a report in the New York Times by Dennis Overbye, not one but a pair of planets that appear to support life have been discovered orbiting a star 1,200 light-years, from constellation Lyra.  The star, yellowish and slightly smaller and dimmer than our Sun, named as Kepler 62f is thought to have two outer stars that may lie in the habitable zone. A best highly educated guess is tha the planets are about half as large as our planet and may be covered by oceans and cloudy skies and it is not known whether anything lives there. NASA’s Ames Research Center, William Borucki, described the news as “one of the best site for Life Out There.” The two planets are about 37-65 million miles from the star and are known to be in the “Goldilocks” zone that is known to have lukewarm temperatures that is suitable for liquid water.

A member of the Kepler 62 team remarked that it resembles our solar system with two habitable planets; Earth and Mars. The results have given a strong conviction that our galaxy may be hosting billions of earth-sized planets and astronomers are optimistic of finding Earth 2.0 that they claim is twin bathing in an alien sun. Many more scientists are trying to find earth-like planets with about 1,000 exoplanets being known as of-to-date. The only problem is that most of these earth-like planets are thousands of light-away years and astronomers may never be sure whether of what the planets are made of. However, Kepler 62 was designed to tell us of how many earth-like planets are there and not which planet to go and live as was pointed out by Kepler’s Dr. Seager.

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